ePaper

Wednesday, June 20, 2018

National diabetes awareness day 2018

  • Print

Diabetes is state of persistant hyperglycemia caused either by insulin secretory deficiency or insulin reistance or both. Insulin is a hormone which is secreted from pancreas and regulates blood sugar level by mediating glucose entry into the most of the cells. Hyperglycaemia, or raised blood sugar, is a common effect of uncontrolled diabetes and over time leads to serious damage to many of the body's systems, especially the nerves and blood vessels.

In 2017, 8.5% of adults aged 18 years and older had diabetes. In 2017, 425 million people had diabetes and International Diabetes Federation (IDF) estimated that in 2045, the total number of people with diabetes will be 629 million; ironiccaly about half the people do not know that they have diabetes.

About 1 in 3 deaths are occurring due diabetes related causes. Diabetes exists as the epidemic in the globe and it is now emergency to take necessary steps to combat it appropriately. The most important major action to may be the preventive measures as about 75% of type 2 diabetes can be prevented by timely interventions.

Diabetesmellitus may

be of 4 types

Type 1 diabetes: Type 1 diabetes (previously known as insulin-dependent, juvenile or childhood-onset) is characterized by deficient insulin production and requires daily administration of insulin. The cause of type 1 diabetes is not known and it is not preventable with current knowledge. Symptoms include excessive excretion of urine (polyuria), thirst (polydipsia), constant hunger, weight loss, vision changes, and fatigue. These symptoms may occur suddenly.

Type 2 diabetes: Type 2 diabetes (formerly called non-insulin-dependent, or adult-onset) results from the body's ineffective use of insulin.

Type 2 diabetes comprises the majority of people with diabetes around the world, and is largely the result of excess body weight and physical inactivity. Symptoms may be similar to those of type 1 diabetes, but are often less marked.

As a result, the disease may be diagnosed several years after onset, once complications have already arisen. Until recently, this type of diabetes was seen only in adults but it is now also occurring increasingly frequently in children.

Gestational diabetes: Gestational diabetes is hyperglycaemia with blood glucose values above normal but below those diagnostic of diabetes, occurring during pregnancy. Women with gestational diabetes are at an increased risk of complications during pregnancy and at delivery. They and their children are also at increased risk of type 2 diabetes in the future. Gestational diabetes is diagnosed through prenatal screening, rather than through reported symptoms.

Impaired glucose tolerance and impaired fasting glycaemia: Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glycaemia (IFG) are intermediate conditions in the transition between normality and diabetes. People with IGT or IFG are at high risk of progressing to type 2 diabetes, although this is not inevitable.

What are common

 consequences of diabetes?

Over time, diabetes can damage the heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys, and nerves.

 * Adults with diabetes have a two- to three-fold increased risk of heart attacks and strokes  u Combined with reduced blood flow, neuropathy (nerve damage) in the feet increases the chance of foot ulcers, infection and eventual need for limb amputation. u Diabetic retinopathy is an important cause of blindness, and occurs as a result of long-term accumulated damage to the small blood vessels in the retina. 2.6% of global blindness can be attributed to diabetes u Diabetes is among the leading causes of kidney failure.

How can the burden of diabetes be reduced?

Prevention: Simple lifestyle measures have been shown to be effective in preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes. To help prevent type 2 diabetes and its complications, people should -

* Achieve and maintain healthy body weight; * Be physically active - at least 30 minutes of regular, moderate-intensity activity on most days. More activity is required for weight control; * Eat a healthy diet, avoiding sugar and saturated fats intake; and u Avoid tobacco use - smoking increases the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

Diagnosis and treatment: Early diagnosis can be accomplished through relatively inexpensive testing of blood sugar. Treatment of diabetes involves diet and physical activity along with lowering blood glucose and the levels of other known risk factors that damage blood vessels. Tobacco use cessation is also important to avoid complications. Interventions that are both cost-saving and feasible in developing countries include:

* Blood glucose control, particularly in type 1 diabetes. People with type 1 diabetes require insulin, people with type 2 diabetes can be treated with oral medication, but may also require insulin; u Blood pressure control; and
 * Foot care.


Source: WHO Fact Sheets

More News For this Category

Vegetables you must include in your diabetes diet

| By
Sushmita Sengupta   Diabetes refers to a diseases that result in too much sugar in the blood Diabetes is also linked with a variety of conditions Lack
Vegetables you must include in your diabetes diet

Health benefits of Blueberries

| By
Blueberries are an all-star food and a colorful and delicious addition to anything from your morning bowl of cereal to your evening scoop of ice cream.Blueberries
Health benefits of Blueberries

Chicken Curry

| By
Ingredients1 kilograms cubed chicken2 teaspoon crushed to paste green chilli1 teaspoon beaten yoghurt (curd)500 gm chopped onion1 teaspoon garam masala powder1 teaspoon garlic paste1 cup water200
Chicken Curry

Butter Chicken Biryani

| By
Ingredients 1 kilograms chicken boneless2 onion1 tablespoon butter400 gm parboiled basmati rice2 cinnamon stick2 green cardamom1/2 cup vegetable oil1 cup tomato pureemint leaves as
Butter Chicken Biryani

What's your source of protein?

| By
Datuk Dr Nor Ashikin Mokhtar The movement against environmental pollution and animal cruelty has led many of us to rethink our food choices, eliminating meat and
What's your source of protein?

From headaches to acne, six Ramadan health tips to help you in the Holy Month

| By
Myriam SakrBoost your health during Ramadan: As we near the last week of the Holy Month, temperatures in the Gulf have risen sharply and it's safe
From headaches to  acne, six Ramadan health tips to help you in the Holy Month

Oven "Fried" Okra and Honey Dijon Dipping Sauce

| By
Ingredients: 20 pods okra * 1/2 cup panko breadcrumbs * 2 whole eggs * 1 tablespoon oregano * 1/2 teaspoon salt * 1/4 teaspoon pepper * 1/4 cup
Oven

Homemade Garlic and Basil Pickles

| By
Ingredients: 1 pickling cucumber u 12 oz. wide mouth Mason jar u 1/2 tsp sea salt u 1/2 tsp minced garlic u 1/2 tsp dried basil leaves u
Homemade Garlic and Basil Pickles

Lost in food of Guhaa

| By
Farizaa SabreenInspired by the Cave like ambience, Guhaa, The Cave Kitchen exudes an impersonal vibe with the warm tones furnishing. The three friends have created this
Lost in food of Guhaa

Hygiene tips every chef should follow!

| By
Imran Amin Many ignore the importance of clean aprons, hair nets, and germ-free hands, but without a proper personal hygiene, even a 5 star restaurant could
Hygiene tips every chef should follow!

© 2018 The Asian Age