ePaper

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Who will win the 2017 Nobel Prize in Literature?

| By and Alex Shephard
There are worse things to get horribly, almost unthinkably wrong than the winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature. (The outcome of a presidential election, for one.) But
Who will win the 2017 Nobel Prize in Literature?

Presenting Bangla Literature to foreign audience

| By and Akbar Hussain
Literature has a universal and unified vision, message and agenda for the world in varied vernaculars. All literature, whether it be poems, essays, novels, or short stories, helps
Presenting Bangla Literature to foreign audience

Love and fatalism in Thomas Hardy's creations

| By and Mahfuz Ul Hasib Chowdhury
Thomas Hardy (1840-1928) is one of the most famed authors of Victorian England. When we speak with references to Victorian England we actually make implications about England during
Love and fatalism in Thomas Hardy's creations

Sebastian Barry: You get imprisoned in a kind of style, I could feel it leaning on me

| By and Justine Jordan
The prize-winning author on leaving Ireland, childhood trauma and finding a new voice"It was literally like being let out of prison," says Sebastian Barry of his
Sebastian Barry: You get imprisoned in a kind of style, I could feel it leaning on me

Vladimir Nabokov's America

| By and John Colapinto
On February 3, 1954, Vladimir Nabokov wrote to James Laughlin, the founder of New Directions, "Would you be interested in publishing a time bomb that I have just
Vladimir Nabokov's America

On my fifth book I'm a debutante: Mike McCormack

| By and Justine Jordan
"I couldn't give my work away, to be honest with you. No one wanted to know." Now in his 50s, Irish writer Mike McCormack spent a decade in
On my fifth book I'm a debutante: Mike McCormack

The unsettling arrival of speculative 9/11 fiction

| By and Joshua Rothman
When I was in high school, my English class read a famous short story called "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge," written in 1890 by Ambrose Bierce. Its
The unsettling arrival of speculative 9/11 fiction

Kate Millett's radical spirit

| By and Rebecca Mead
Kate Millett, the pioneering feminist author, died last week, at the age of eighty-two. Her obituaries report that she suffered a heart attack while on vacation in Paris,
Kate Millett's radical spirit

Mir Mosharraf Hossain's shaping of Ocean of Sorrow

| By and Dr. Fakrul Alam
While the core story of Hossain's Ocean of Sorrow is historical, it has to be said that he treats history imaginatively and takes considerable liberties with recorded history.
Mir Mosharraf Hossain's shaping of Ocean of Sorrow

Things you may not know about Leo Tolstoy

| By
Tolstoy was a self-improvement junkie: Inspired in part by the 13 virtues Benjamin Franklin spelled out in his autobiography, Tolstoy created a seemingly endless list of rules by
Things you may not know about Leo Tolstoy

Who is a braver hero: Hector or Achilles?

| By
The Iliad by Homer focuses on one small part of the Trojan War, nine years into the siege. It is primarily about the war as it is affected
Who is a braver hero: Hector or Achilles?

Bloomsday is over but James Joyce left plenty of trail to trace

| By
This year, more than most, offers plenty of excuses to celebrate the life and work of James Joyce. This January marked the 76th anniversary of his death. Bloomsday
Bloomsday is over but James Joyce  left plenty of trail to trace

Flashback to the taste of winter's delight

| By and Rebecca Haque
After the rains, after the heat envelopes me once more in this month of Jaistha, I sit in my netted verandah in the dusky evening and look at
Flashback to the taste of winter's delight

Acclaimed authors evaded by Nobel Prize

| By and Mahfuz Ul Hasib Chowdhury
This article focuses on four highly admired authors from four different countries. Two of them are still alive while another two are no more among us. However, what
Acclaimed authors evaded by Nobel Prize

The moon shone on her face

| By and Syed Badrul Ahsan
The little girl I first saw in 1962 died last week. She was too young to die; and I was too cruel not to receive her calls, those
The moon shone on her face

Another bend in the river for Naipaul

| By and Mel Gussow
Vidiadhar Surajprasad Naipa-ul's novel, 'Half a Life,' is about the journey -- geographical and emotional -- of Willie Chandran, a man from India who emigrates to England and
Another bend in the river for Naipaul

Things you should know about Fyodor Dostoevsky

| By and Lani Seelinger
If you've ever opened a book of Fyodor Dostoevsky's, you must have picked up that the man behind it was complicated and fascinating. His books have a unique
Things you should know about Fyodor Dostoevsky

Nurul and his notebook

| By
Original : Muhammed Zafar IqbalEnglish translation: HaroonuzzamanOn my return to Dhaka, I became utterly dim-witted. Hardly were there any signs of military presence; shops and bazaars
Nurul and his notebook

Childhood fantasy re-visits

| By and Mahbubar Rahman
In barber's revolving chair, the barber makes me seated and covers the upper part of my body by a white shroud fastened around my neck to my pleasant
Childhood fantasy re-visits

How a novel became a classic

| By and Jane Sullivan
When Gabriel García Márquez's most famous novel was published 50 years ago,  it faced a difficult publishing climate and baffled reviews."Many years later, as he faced
How a novel became a classic

© 2017 The Asian Age